Prof. Jean Hertzberg, University of Colorado, Boulder
Prof. Jean Hertzberg, University of Colorado, Boulder

I have been a Mechanical Engineering faculty member at the University of Colorado, Boulder, (CU) since 1991, teaching fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, experimental techniques and design to graduate and undergraduate students. I have maintained a small, student-focused research program, supervising 15 Phds, 23 Masters, and 150 undergraduates over the years.The research is generally human-scale experimental fluid physics ranging from combustion to cardiac hemodynamics, and always features some type of flow or data visualization.  I favor collaboration with and empowerment of research students, and a small program enables me to spend time with students individually. Since 2006 I have also been active in faculty development and CU’s excellent disciplinary-based education research (DBER) community, where I have learned a tremendous amount about the science of teaching and learning, particularly in the sciences and engineering.

My full CV has all the details. Here’s a third-person version for seminar announcements:

Dr. Hertzberg is currently Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at CU-Boulder. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in measurement techniques, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, design and computer tools. She has pioneered a spectacular course on the art and physics of flow visualization, and is conducting research on the impact of the course with respect to visual perception and educational outcomes. Her disciplinary research centers around pulsatile, vortex dominated flows with applications in both combustion and bio-fluid dynamics. She is also interested in a variety of flow field measurement techniques. Current projects include electrospray atomization of jet fuel and velocity and vorticity in human cardiac ventricles and large vessels.

Feel free to contact me. Comments welcome.

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Prof. Jean Hertzberg, University of Colorado, Boulder
Prof. Jean Hertzberg, University of Colorado, Boulder. Burning magnesium in dry ice produces a dense fog during a CU Wizards show in 2003.

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